A. J. Cronin | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Robert Burns

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A. J. Cronin.
This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert Burns

Critical Essay by Robert Burns

This curiously old-fashioned novel [A Song of Sixpence] is Doctor Cronin's fourteenth, published 35 years after his first, Hatter's Castle. This record demonstrates that Cronin is a prolific writer who has made few concessions to the ephemeral tastes of literary reviewers. A Song of Sixpence is traditional Cronin as much as The Citadel and Keys of the Kingdom but I must confess that I found it pleasant reading.

Set in his familiar pre-war Scotland, A Song of Sixpence traces the coming to manhood of Laurence Carroll, an unbelievably unspoiled youngster of Dickensian cast. The events of his life, although catastrophic in themselves are not nearly tortuous or agonizing enough to satisfy most contemporary novelists. And drastically unlike the latter, Cronin posts only exterior forces toward the development of his characters. The Freudian struggles so essential to...

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This section contains 506 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert Burns