Cranford (novel) | Critical Essay by Wendy K. Carse

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of Cranford (novel).
This section contains 6,679 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Wendy K. Carse

Critical Essay by Wendy K. Carse

SOURCE: “A Penchant for Narrative: ‘Mary Smith’ in Elizabeth Gaskell's Cranford,” in Journal of Narrative Technique, Vol. 20, No. 3, Fall, 1990, pp. 318-30.

In the following essay, Carse investigates the character and interpretive role of Cranford's self-effacing narrator, Mary Smith.

Readers must wait until chapter twelve before the narrator of Elizabeth Gaskell's Cranford finally promises to “say a word or two here about myself” (117). What then follows, however, is not at all a revelation about herself, but only a brief comment, necessitated by the plot, explaining why she has extended her recent visit to Cranford. This reticence is perhaps the reason that critics of Gaskell's most popular fiction seldom give more than brief attention to her narrator; when she is mentioned at all, the tendency is to dismiss her...

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This section contains 6,679 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Wendy K. Carse
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