Cranford (novel) | Critical Essay by Margaret Case Croskery

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Cranford (novel).
This section contains 8,258 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by George V. Griffith

Critical Essay by Margaret Case Croskery

SOURCE: “Mothers without Children, Unity without Plot: Cranford's Radical Charm,” in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Vol. 52, No. 2, September, 1997, pp. 198-220.

In the following essay, Croskery probes the charming, complex, and experimental narrative technique of Cranford, arguing that the work represents a significant development in nineteenth century sympathy and reform novels.

Early in the modern critical reappraisal of Elizabeth Gaskell, John Gross perceptively warned that Gaskell's charm might lead critics to undervalue her work despite the fact that “her reputation has held steady for a hundred years.”1 This is both an odd warning and an apt one, especially in the case of Cranford (1851-53), which is perhaps the most charming of all of Gaskell's works. I will argue that this novel's “charm” presents something of a critical challenge...

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This section contains 8,258 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by George V. Griffith
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