Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture | Critical Review by Publishers Weekly

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture.
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SOURCE: A review of Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, in Publishers Weekly, Vol. 238, No. 6, February 1, 1991, p. 77.

In the following review of Coupland's Generation X, the critic provides a brief overview of the work.

Newcomer Coupland sheds light on an often overlooked segment of the population: "Generation X," the post-baby boomers who must endure "legislated nostalgia (to force a body of people to have memories they do not actually own)" and who indulge in "knee-jerk irony (the tendency to make flippant ironic comments as a reflexive matter of course …)." These are just two of the many terse, bitterly on-target observations and cartoons that season the margins of the text [in Generation X]. The plot frames a loose Decameron-style collection of "bedtime stories" told by three friends, Dag, Andy and Claire, who have fled society for the relative tranquility of Palm Springs. They...

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This section contains 220 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Publishers Weekly
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