Coriolanus | Critical Essay by Robert N. Watson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 65 pages of analysis & critique of Coriolanus.
This section contains 19,263 words
(approx. 65 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert N. Watson

Critical Essay by Robert N. Watson

SOURCE: “Martial Ambition and the Family Romance in Coriolanus,” in Shakespeare and the Hazards of Ambition, Harvard University Press, 1984, pp. 142-221.

In the following excerpt, Watson views Coriolanus's development in the play as a journey from his “natural self,” as a man with a questionable hereditary identity, to an “artificial self,”—an ideal, even divine, warrior.

Coriolanus aspires to replace his limited hereditary identity with an ideal martial one, to transform himself from a merely human creature, made of flesh, appetite, and compassion, into a virtually divine warrior, made of steel, honor, and wrath. The story of Coriolanus' journey from a natural to an artificial self has epic attributes. It begins in medias res; it implicitly involves the hero's temporary death, his visitation by a...

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This section contains 19,263 words
(approx. 65 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert N. Watson