James Fenimore Cooper | Critical Essay by Mark Twain

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of James Fenimore Cooper.
This section contains 3,218 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mark Twain

Critical Essay by Mark Twain

SOURCE: "Fenimore Cooper's Further Literary Offenses," in The New England Quarterly, Vol. XIX, No. 3, September, 1946, pp. 291-301.

In the following essay, originally composed in 1895, Twain criticizes Cooper for his inflexible style and verbosity.

Young Gentlemen: In studying Cooper you still find it profitable to study him in detail—word by word, sentence by sentence. For every sentence of his is interesting. Interesting because of its make-up, its peculiar make-up, its original make-up. Let us examine a sentence or two, and see. Here is a passage from Chapter XI of The Last of the Mohicans one of the most famous and most admired of Cooper's books:

Notwithstanding the swiftness of their flight, one of the Indians had found an opportunity to strike a straggling fawn with an arrow, and had borne the more preferable fragments of the victim, patiently on...

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This section contains 3,218 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mark Twain
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