John Maxwell Coetzee | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Derek Wright

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of John Maxwell Coetzee.
This section contains 3,316 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Derek Wright

Critical Essay by Derek Wright

SOURCE: "Fiction as Foe: The Novels of J. M. Coetzee," in International Fiction Review, Vol. 16, No. 2, Summer, 1989, pp. 113-18.

In the following essay, Wright examines Coetzee's fiction as representative of a hostile colonial act in itself.

The settings of J. M. Coetzee's five novels are, at first glance, unusual for a contemporary South-African writer. They are, respectively, the United States, undefined parts of the South-African hinterland of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the frontier of an unnamed country on "the roof of the world," a war-ravaged Cape Town and Karoo of the future, and the fictional-cum-metafictional territory of the Robinson Crusoe fable. In fact, each of the novels is, not surprisingly, a fictional extrapolation from South Africa's current historical crisis. In these fictional projections, however, the very fictional properties of myth, ideology...

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This section contains 3,316 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Derek Wright
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