John Maxwell Coetzee | Literature Criticism Critical Review by Michiko Kakutani

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of John Maxwell Coetzee.
This section contains 811 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Michiko Kakutani

Critical Review by Michiko Kakutani

SOURCE: "Childhood Hurt and Fear as a Writer's Inspiration," in New York Times, October 7, 1997, p. E8.

In the following review, Kakutani discusses the early elements of Coetzee's life, as described in Boyhood, that led to his later writing career.

Though Boyhood has the stylized, fablelike quality of so much of J. M. Coetzee's fiction, it is not a coming-of-age novel, but a memoir that happens to be told in the third person and the present tense. It is a fiercely revealing, bluntly unsentimental work that both creates a telling portrait of the artist as a young man and illuminates the hidden courses of his art.

Indeed, the seeds of Mr. Coetzee's mature work—Waiting for the Barbarians, Life and Times of Michael K, Foe and Age of Iron—can all...

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This section contains 811 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Michiko Kakutani
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