Christopher Hitchens | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Christopher Hitchens.
This section contains 2,288 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ross McKibbin

SOURCE: McKibbin, Ross. “Against It.” London Review of Books (24 February 1994): 18.

In the following review, McKibbin offers a generally positive assessment of For the Sake of Argument, however, he cites limitations in Hitchens's “oppositional” stance.

Christopher Hitchens may not be ‘the nearest thing to a one-man band since I. F. Stone laid down his pen,’ but he comes close. For the Sake of Argument records a life of action, of being in the right place at the right time. Thomas Mann could never find the revolution: Hitchens cannot help tripping over it. This is, no doubt, the privilege of the foreign correspondent, but some are clearly more privileged than others. He turns up in Central America, in Central Europe, in Eastern Europe, in the Middle East, always at the crucial historical moment: he can extract from these moments a tragic episode or a comic anecdote which illuminates the whole...

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This section contains 2,288 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Ross McKibbin
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Critical Review by Ross McKibbin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.