Agatha Christie | Critical Essay by Earl F. Bargainnier

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of Agatha Christie.
This section contains 3,126 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Earl F. Bargainnier

SOURCE: "The Poems of Agatha Christie," in Journal of Popular Culture, Vol. 21, No. 3, Winter, 1987, pp. 103-10.

In the following essay, Bargainnier analyzes Christie's collection of poetry, discussing what her poems reveal about her personality.

In her autobiography Agatha Christie wrote, "The creative urge can come out in any form: in embroidery, in cooking of interesting dishes, in painting, drawing and sculpture, in composing music, as well as in writing books and stories. The only difference is that you can be a great deal more grand about some of these things than others." Christie was never "grand" about her detective fiction, and was even less so about her poetry. Yet in 1973, three years before her death, she permitted a small volume of her "collected" poems to be published. Christie's position as the most popular British writer ever deserves some analysis of her poems and their...

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This section contains 3,126 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Earl F. Bargainnier
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Earl F. Bargainnier from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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