Agatha Christie | Critical Essay by M. Vipond

This literature criticism consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis & critique of Agatha Christie.
This section contains 2,447 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Agatha Christie's Women," in The International Fiction Review, Vol. 8, No. 2, Summer, 1981, pp. 119-23.

In the following essay, Vipond attempts to clarify Christie's representation of women, arguing that Christie's female characters are products of the time.

Agatha Christie's characters are stereotypes and caricatures, but they are not just that. They possess not simply two dimensions but two and a half. The little bit of fun gently poked at the "typical" figure, the slightly surprising or contradictory quality, the merest touch of real humanity—all make Christie's types just a bit more than cardboard puppets dancing to the choreography of the plot. In her characterization as in her puzzles, Christie found the perfect balance, the hallmark of the really skilled popular writer, between convention and invention. She gave her readers exactly what they anticipated, yet added just enough that was intriguingly new to keep them...

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This section contains 2,447 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by M. Vipond
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by M. Vipond from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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