Much Ado About Nothing | Children of the Mind: Miscarried Narratives in Much
Ado about Nothing

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Much Ado About Nothing.
This section contains 7,371 words
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Stephen B. Dobranski, Georgia State University

An idea for a short story about people in Manhattan who are constantly creating these real unnecessary neurotic problems for themselves 'cause it keeps them from dealing with more unsolvable, terrifying problems about the universe.

—Woody Allen, Manhattan

When Beatrice first speaks in Much Ado about Nothing, she inquires after Benedick: "I pray you, is Signior Mountanto returned from the wars or no?" (I.i.28-9).1 That her first concern is Benedick's welfare suggests an interest in him beyond their ongoing "skirmish of wit" (I.i.58). Like Benedick's assertion that Beatrice exceeds Hero "as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December" (Li. 178-9), her question looks ahead to their open acknowledgment of love and concluding nuptials. That Beatrice refers to Benedick as "Signior Mountanto" (I...

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This section contains 7,371 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Children of the Mind: Miscarried Narratives in Much Ado about Nothing