Lydia Child | Critical Essay by Bruce Mills

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of Lydia Child.
This section contains 8,368 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Seth Curtis Beach

Critical Essay by Bruce Mills

SOURCE: "A Reading History: 'Hobomok' and Its Audience," in Cultural Transformations: Lydia Maria Child and the Literature of Reform, The University of Georgia Press, 1994, pp. 11-29.

In the following essay, Mills focuses on Hobomok, exploring the tensions in the novel over race relations and colonialism in America.

When Lydia Maria Child produced her first novel Hobomok in 1824, she was especially conscious of the prevailing literary tastes and social views held by men who stood prominently behind the pulpits, podiums, and desks of such key religious, academic, and literary institutions as the Unitarian church, Harvard College, the North American Review, and the Boston Athenaeum.1 The novel and its reception provide a case study in how a social ideology, uniquely concentrated in identifiable civic associations and eloquently set forth by community spokesmen, shaped the creation and interpretation of an early American novel...

(read more)

This section contains 8,368 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Seth Curtis Beach
Follow Us on Facebook