John Cheever | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of John Cheever.
This section contains 622 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert M. Adams

[Oh What a Paradise It Seems] is what Henry James delighted to call … a nouvelle; and it would almost seem that the old master had Mr. Cheever in his mind's eye when he wrote of "the only compactness that has a charm, the only spareness that has a force, the only simplicity that has a grace—those, in each order, that produce the rich effect." Though the canvas is small in this new novel, it is not miniature work; it is broad, impressionistic, at its best a poetic narrative.

The book's central figure is a man of some years … [who is] shaken by a sense of the fragile beauty of vanishing things. He lives and works in what is clearly New York City, and spends much of his time in what could be the Connecticut suburbs—though really his world is almost limitless because it persistently shades off...

(read more)

This section contains 622 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert M. Adams
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Robert M. Adams from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.