John Cheever | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of John Cheever.
This section contains 689 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Updike

["Oh What a Paradise It Seems"] is too darting, too gaudy in its deployment of artifice and aside, too disarmingly personal in its voice, to be saddled with the label of novel or novella; it is a parable and a tall tale—both sub-genres squarely within the Judeo-Christian tradition, North American branch. Cheever has lately taken the mantle of that tradition ever more comfortably upon his shoulders, and now unabashedly assumes the accents of a seer…. Ever more boldly the celebrant of the grand poetry of life, Cheever, once a taut and mordant chronicler of urban and suburban disappointments, now speaks in the cranky, granular, impulsive, confessional style of our native wise men and exhorters since Emerson. The pitch of his final page is positively Transcendental:

The thought of stars contributed to the power of his feeling. What moved him was a sense of those worlds around us...

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This section contains 689 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Updike
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Critical Essay by John Updike from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.