John Cheever | Critical Essay by Burton Kendle

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of John Cheever.
This section contains 1,567 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Burton Kendle

Critical Essay by Frederick Bracher

The stories in [The Way Some People Live (1943)] sound the knowing, wry, ironic note of The New Yorker in the late thirties, and in both tone and content they suggest John O'Hara. But the most successful stories—like "Survivor," "In the Eyes of God," or "Forever Hold Your Peace"—have moral implications beyond the range of the bitter anecdote. In The Enormous Radio (1953), the assured elegance of Cheever's style is matched by a heightened moral sensibility, and many of the stories, turning away from the frustrations and blind alleys of urban life, celebrate the continuing possibilities of human experience. The volume contains some of Cheever's best, and some of his best known, stories: "Goodbye, My Brother," "The Children," "Torch Song," "The Summer Farmer," and the title story. The Housebreaker of Shady Hill (1958) moves from the city to the...

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This section contains 1,567 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Burton Kendle
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