Charlotte Perkins Gilman | Critical Essay by Martha J. Cutter

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
This section contains 8,937 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martha J. Cutter

SOURCE: “Of Metatexts, Metalanguages, and Possible Worlds: The Transformative Power of Metanarrative in C. P. Gilman's Later Short Fiction,” in American Literary Realism, Vol. 31, No. 1, fall, 1998, pp. 41-59.

In the following essay, Cutter analyzes Gilman's stories about language.

In The Man-Made World; or, Our Androcentric Culture [hereafter abbreviated as The Man-Made World] (1911) Charlotte Perkins Gilman articulates a feminist critique of language that interconnects women's oppression and the linguistic practices of a patriarchal society. On the grammatical level itself language reflects women's disempowered social status, as Gilman explains: “Even in the naming of other animals we have taken the male as the race type, and put on a special termination to indicate ‘his female,’ as in lion, lioness; leopard, leopardess; while all our human scheme of things rests on the same tacit assumption; man being held the...

(read more)

This section contains 8,937 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martha J. Cutter
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Martha J. Cutter from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook