Herland (novel) | Critical Essay by Thomas Galt Peyser

This literature criticism consists of approximately 25 pages of analysis & critique of Herland (novel).
This section contains 7,291 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Thomas Galt Peyser

Critical Essay by Thomas Galt Peyser

SOURCE: “Reproducing Utopia: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Herland,” in Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 20, No. 1, spring, 1992, pp. 1-16.

In the following essay, Peyser argues against prevailing interpretations of Herland, claiming that “the imagination of utopia depends on the pre-existence of a utopian imagination.”

According to the prevailing view of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland, the utopian novel suited the aims of a radical feminism by subverting the confinements of a realism dedicated to the representation of, and thus acquiescence to, a patriarchal order. Summing up this position, Susan Gubar argues that “women abused by the probable refuse it by imagining the possible in a revolutionary rejection of patriarchal culture;” “feminism imagines an alternative reality that is truly fantastic.”1 Along these lines, Herland is...

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This section contains 7,291 words
(approx. 25 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Thomas Galt Peyser
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