Raymond Carver | Critical Essay by Arthur M. Saltzman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 28 pages of analysis & critique of Raymond Carver.
This section contains 8,292 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Cathedral," in Understanding Raymond Carver, University of South Carolina Press, 1988, pp. 124-56.

In the following excerpt, Saltzman compares such stories as "Feathers," "Chef's House," and "The Compartment"—which reflect hopelessness and despair—with "A Small, Good Thing" and "Where I'm Calling From" in which Carver allows his characters more compassion and choice.

"I knew I'd gone as far the other way as I could or wanted to go, cutting everything down to the marrow, not just to the bone.1 In this way Carver announces a deliberate departure from the relentless austerity of What We Talk About When We Talk About Love in favor of the "fleshed out" fictions of Cathedral. "Generous" is the term of approval employed by several reviewers to recognize the ventilation of the claustrophobic method and attitude that heretofore had dominated Carver's work. Perhaps befitting the increased stability...

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This section contains 8,292 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Arthur M. Saltzman
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Arthur M. Saltzman from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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