Raymond Carver | Critical Essay by Eugene Goodheart

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Raymond Carver.
This section contains 1,878 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Eugene Goodheart

SOURCE: "Raymond Carver's Cathedral," in Pieces of Resistance, Cambridge University Press, 1987, pp. 162-66.

In the following essay, Goodheart analyzes Carver's moral code, arguing that he is at his best when his characters adhere to it.

The affectless narrative voice of a Raymond Carver story defends itself against surprise or shock or pain. The most banal situations propose inexplicable signs of menace that require, in response, a discipline of unemotional terseness. Nothing much happens at the dinner party in "Feathers," the first of the stories in Carver's latest collection, except for the weird appearance of a vulture-sized peacock, which stares at the guests and to which Jack, the narrator, responds at intervals with three "god damns," as if the word were a talisman for preserving equanimity. The peacock, the plaster cast of misshapen teeth on top of the TV, the very ugly baby of the hosts...

(read more)

This section contains 1,878 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Eugene Goodheart
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Eugene Goodheart from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook