Raymond Carver | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Mark A. R. Facknitz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Raymond Carver.
This section contains 4,816 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mark A. R. Facknitz

Critical Essay by Mark A. R. Facknitz

SOURCE: "'The Calm,' 'A Small Good Thing,' and 'Cathedral': Raymond Carver and the Rediscovery of Human Worth," in Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 23, No. 3, Summer, 1986, pp. 287-96.

In the following essay, Facknitz compares "The Calm," "A Small Good Thing," and "Cathedral," arguing that these stories represent unique attempts by Carver to create acceptance, closure, and connection among his characters.

Raymond Carver is as successful as a short story writer in America can be. The signs of his success are many: prestigious and ample grants, publication in the best literary quarterlies and national magazines, and, from all appearances, an unperturbed ability to write the kind of stories he wishes to write. By contrast, the causes of his success are ambiguous. Carver's writing is often facile, and one...

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This section contains 4,816 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mark A. R. Facknitz
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