Raymond Carver | Critical Essay by Kirk Nesset

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Raymond Carver.
This section contains 6,975 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kirk Nesset

SOURCE: "Insularity and Self-Enlargement in Raymond Carver's Cathedral," in Essays in Literature, Vol. 21, No. 1, Spring, 1994, pp. 116-28.

In the essay below, Nesset, a professor at Whittier college, argues that the stories in Cathedral differ from Carver's earlier work in that some of the characters are able to escape their self-imposed insularity.

In "The Compartment," one of Raymond Carver's bleakest stories, a man passes through the French countryside in a train, en route to a rendevous with a son he has not seen for many years. "Now and then," the narrator says of the man, "Meyers saw a farmhouse and its outbuildings, everything surrounded by a wall. He thought this might be a good way to live—in an old house surrounded by a wall" (Cathedral 48). Due to a last minute change of heart, however, Meyers chooses to stay insulated in his "compartment" and, remaining...

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This section contains 6,975 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Kirk Nesset
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Kirk Nesset from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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