Raymond Carver | Critical Essay by Randolph Paul Runyon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 64 pages of analysis & critique of Raymond Carver.
This section contains 19,037 words
(approx. 64 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: "Cathedral," in Reading Raymond Carver, Syracuse University Press, 1992, pp. 137-85.

In the excerpt below, Runyon examines the connecting elements and recurring themes in the short stories from Cathedral.

"feathers"

"Before and after" (14), Bud said, holding up an "old plaster-of-Paris cast of the most crooked, jaggedy teeth in the world" (12) next to his wife Olla's orthodontically straightened ones. It is one of several sights Jack and Fran have to endure on their visit to Bud and Olla's house. Another is the pet peacock that wanders into the house during dinner, is "smelly" (25), and lets out blood-curdling screams. Still another is their hosts' offspring, "the ugliest baby" Jack has "ever seen," with "no neck to speak of" and "three or four fat chins" (20).

Yet Jack, who narrates the story, is able to say that "that evening at Bud and Olla's was special…. That evening...

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This section contains 19,037 words
(approx. 64 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Randolph Paul Runyon
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Randolph Paul Runyon from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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