Carl Sandburg | Critical Essay by Llewellyn Jones

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of Carl Sandburg.
This section contains 3,668 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Llewellyn Jones

SOURCE: Jones, Llewellyn. “Carl Sandburg: Formalist.” In First Impressions: Essays on Poetry, Criticism, and Prosody, pp. 53-68. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1925.

In the following excerpt, Jones evaluates Sandburg as a poet and underscores his strongly satirical voice.

In the layman's mind there are two kinds of physician: the up-to-date specialist with his elaborate examinations, his apparatus, and his “air”; and, on the other hand, the rough-and-ready country doctor with his absence of “air,” his hail-fellow-well-met attitude, his lack of up-to-date science, and his ability to cure.

Having made this nice distinction between doctors, the public is very likely to apply it to the poets. It likes to think of some poets, Robert Bridges, for instance, as scholarly, certain, using each metrical device with intention, and knowing just what they are aiming at...

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This section contains 3,668 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Llewellyn Jones
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Llewellyn Jones from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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