Candide | Critical Essay by Peter Kivy

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Candide.
This section contains 6,133 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Peter Kivy

SOURCE: Kivy, Peter. “Voltaire, Hume, and the Problem of Evil.” Philosophy and Literature 3, no. 2 (fall 1979): 211-24.

In the following essay, Kivy argues for the restoration of Candide's status as a text of philosophical significance.

I

Voltaire's Candide is subtitled Optimism. It is about an impossibly naive young man who suffers incredible misfortune, while counselled by his teacher, Pangloss, to perceive the hidden benefits that this merely “apparent” misfortune and misery produce. Pangloss' speeches in this regard are well-larded with phrases and terms coined or made famous by Leibniz, and, so as not to leave the connection merely hinted at, the name of the philosopher himself is also invoked, as for example, where Voltaire has Pangloss say: “I still hold my original views, for I am still a philosopher. It would not be proper for...

(read more)

This section contains 6,133 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Peter Kivy
Copyrights
Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Peter Kivy from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook