The First Man | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of The First Man.
This section contains 1,791 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Elizabeth Hawes

SOURCE: "Sunlight and Silence," in The Nation, October 2, 1995, pp. 358-60.

In the following review, Hawes discusses Camus's artistic and thematic concerns in The First Man.

Back in 1960, the sudden death of Albert Camus at the age of 46 was a tragic event for young intellectuals, like the breach of a promise, the end of then and the beginning of now. Memories of the day still remain—the photograph of the Facel Vega wrapped around a tree, the muddy briefcase in a field, the sense of personal loss, the unbearable Absurdity of it all. "Rarely have the nature of a man's work and the conditions of the historical moment so clearly demanded that a writer go on living," Jean-Paul Sartre mourned. "No modern writer that I can think of, except Camus, has aroused love," Susan Sontag wrote from America.

More than Sartre or Gide or even Malraux, Albert Camus had...

(read more)

This section contains 1,791 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Elizabeth Hawes
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by Elizabeth Hawes from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook