The Piano | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Stella Bruzzi

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of The Piano.
This section contains 3,743 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Stella Bruzzi

SOURCE: "Bodyscape," in Sight and Sound, Vol. 3, No. 10, October, 1993, pp. 6-10.

In the following essay, Bruzzi compares The Piano to other dramatic works dealing with sexuality in the Victorian Age and argues that The Piano is a "cryptic and evocative exploration of how women's sexuality, clothes and lives interconnect."

At the beginning of The Piano, Ada (Holly Hunter), a mute Scottish woman, arrives in New Zealand with her nine-year-old daughter Flora. They disembark on a remote beach, where they are left by the sailors who accompanied them to await Ada's new husband Stewart (Sam Neill), a rich local landowner. Their strung-out possessions are silhouetted in a flimsy line against the evening sun. Another silhouetted, skeletal structure comes into shot: a tent, made from Ada's hoops and underskirts, beneath which they shelter for the...

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This section contains 3,743 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stella Bruzzi
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