Camilo José Cela | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Camilo José Cela.
This section contains 157 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Terrell Louise Tatum

SOURCE: Tatum, Terrell Louise. Review of Baraja de invenciones, by Camilo José Cela. Books Abroad 29, no. 1 (winter 1955): 45.

In the following review, Tatum calls the pieces in Baraja de invenciones shocking and gloomy.

Spain's distinguished “inventor” prefaces this collection [Baraja de invenciones] with a brief, but striking Autobiografía in which he says: “Me considero el más importante novelista español desde el 98.”

Thirty-three “invenciones” comprise the collection and their impact is often shocking. Old and young Celaesque types, principally Spanish, stalk starkly and tragically through the poetry-impregnated pages. They move like peasants plodding before their oxen along the roads and through the villages of Spain. Or like earlier Cela madrileños, hurrying to their swarming or lonely pisos, bending against the winter wind from the Guadarramas. Closely identified with these people are the animals which serve them and the violent, but unforgettable Spanish landscape that surrounds them...

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This section contains 157 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Terrell Louise Tatum
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Critical Review by Terrell Louise Tatum from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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