Erskine Caldwell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Erskine Caldwell.
This section contains 984 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William Soskin

SOURCE: "Caldwell Has Seen Their Faces," in New York Herald Tribune Books, June 19, 1938, p. 5.

In this review of Southways, Soskin detects a change in these stories from Caldwell's earlier work, observing a greater brevity and intensity: "he writes the bare, bedrock story hammered into an immediate situation as though he could not bear to write at greater length. "

One of the least profitable of industries is that of classifying and cataloguing Erskine Caldwell. Ever since American Earth and Tobacco Road appeared, and even when a lesser known and privately circulated novel called The Bastard made Mr. Caldwell's talents apparent, reviewers and readers have been arguing the questions of whether he is primarily a comic satirist, an amoral sensationalist, a social propaganda writer, a plain realist, or—since his home ground in Georgia lends itself to all these categories—just a writer with the South in his mouth.

Nobody...

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This section contains 984 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by William Soskin
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Critical Essay by William Soskin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.