Erskine Caldwell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Erskine Caldwell.
This section contains 6,009 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ronald Wesley Hoag

SOURCE: "Canonize Caldwell's Georgia Boy: A Case for Resurrection," in Erskine Caldwell Reconsidered, edited by Edwin T. Arnold, University Press of Mississippi, 1990, pp. 72-85.

In the essay below, Hoag examines the ways in which the pieces in Georgia Boy comprise a unified story-cycle.

Morris Stroup is no saint, but he deserves to be saved. Also worthy of salvation are his wife, Martha; his son, William; his yardboy, Handsome Brown; his jailbird brother, Ned; and an assortment of preachers, grass widows, gypsy queens, town marshals, necktie salesladies, ridgepole goats, shirt-tail woodpeckers, enticed calves and entrapped dogs, a triumphant fighting cock and a heartbreaking chicken pot pie. If it were up to me, I would elect them all, the whole damned circus and menagerie. Lamentable indeed is the moribund state of so much life, the more so in an age of canon revision. Unsustained by the adrenaline of his early...

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This section contains 6,009 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ronald Wesley Hoag
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Critical Essay by Ronald Wesley Hoag from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.