Erskine Caldwell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of Erskine Caldwell.
This section contains 4,768 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Scott MacDonald

SOURCE: "Repetition as Technique in the Short Stories of Erskine Caldwell," in Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 5, No. 2, Autumn, 1977, pp. 213-25.

In the following essay, MacDonald details Caldwell's use of repetition in his characters ' speeches, in descriptions of settings and events, and in the structures of his short stories.

James Dickey has said [in Sorties, 1971] that Thomas Wolfe's work is "so rhetorical that it is almost a shameful act. But there should be such rhetorical writing, as the indication of a kind of limit." The converse might be said about Erskine Caldwell's short fiction. In many of his stories Caldwell's style is so spare and so completely unadorned that the reader learns just how few of the traditional literary devices a writer can use and still create stories which are meaningful and effective. While the hallmark of Caldwell's prose style is simplicity, however, a careful investigation of...

(read more)

This section contains 4,768 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Scott MacDonald
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Scott MacDonald from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.