Sailing to Byzantium | Critical Essay by Michael Steinman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Sailing to Byzantium.
This section contains 802 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Michael Steinman

SOURCE: “Yeats's ‘Sailing to Byzantium’,” in The Explicator, Vol. 52, No. 2, Winter, 1994, pp. 93-94.

In the following essay, Steinman submits Shakespeare's King Lear as the origin for the bird imagery in “Sailing to Byzantium.”

In “The Circus Animals' Desertion,” W. B. Yeats asserted that his images “[g]rew in pure mind” (630). But the golden bird of “Sailing to Byzantium” may make us feel that “pure mind,” although compelling, is not sufficient explanation. Where did that singing bird come from? Yeats's creative eclecticism, blending the morning's conversation with philosophical abstractions, makes the notion of one and only one source for any image implausible: see Frank O'Connor's comments on the genesis of “Lapis Lazuli,&#x...

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This section contains 802 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael Steinman
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