A Clockwork Orange | Literature Criticism Rubin Rabinovitz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of A Clockwork Orange.
This section contains 3,071 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
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Rubin Rabinovitz

SOURCE: "Ethical Values in Anthony Burgess's Clockwork Orange," in Studies in the Novel, Vol. XI, No. 1, Spring, 1979, pp. 43-50.

In the following essay, Rabinovitz comments on Burgess's presentation in A Clockwork Orange of the notion of "social history as a cyclical alternation" of diametrically opposed views of human nature and morality.

In Anthony Burgess's most famous novel, A Clockwork Orange [1962 British edition, which includes the final, twenty-first chapter], the most obvious clash of values is between the lawless hero and a society that hopes to control him. This struggle obscures another conflict which is nevertheless very important: the opposing views of libertarians and authoritarians on how best to provide social controls. The theme of libertarian-authoritarian opposition recurs throughout Burgess's novels, often as a conflict between points of view Burgess has called Pelagian and...

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This section contains 3,071 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rubin Rabinovitz
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