A Clockwork Orange | Literature Criticism Critical Review by Julian Mitchell

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A Clockwork Orange.
This section contains 569 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Julian Mitchell

Critical Review by Julian Mitchell

SOURCE: "Horrorshow on Amis Avenue," in The Spectator, Vol. 95, No. 6986, May 18, 1962, pp. 661-62.

Mitchell is an English novelist, playwright, and critic. In the following positive review, he lauds A Clockwork Orange as a brilliant mixture of horror and farce, calling Burgess's use of language an "extraordinary technical feat."

Anthony Burgess must have garnered some excellent reviews in his short, busy writing career (A Clockwork Orange is his eighth novel since 1956). No one can match his skill at anguished farce about the end of empire. His characters seem to be trapped in a tent whose pole has just been sawn in two by an over-enthusiastic administrator doing his part in a campaign to save wood. It is hilarious to watch their frantic heaving and humping beneath the spoiled canvas, to hear their absurd multilingual pidgin groans. But...

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This section contains 569 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Julian Mitchell
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