Mikhail Bulgakov | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Mikhail Bulgakov.
This section contains 5,737 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sigrid McLaughlin

SOURCE: "Structure and Meaning in Bulgakov's The Fatal Eggs,'" in Russian Literature Triquarterly, No. 15, 1978, pp. 263-79.

In the following essay, McLaughlin explores the "narrative mechanism" that Bulgakov uses to relate the events of "The Fatal Eggs, " thereby demonstrating that the story is not only a social satire but also a commentary on moral and philosophical issues.

The critics—irrespective of their political stand—characterize "The Fatal Eggs" inevitably and not incorrectly as a social satire. But to view the story exclusively as a social satire is to ignore a number of textual features which strongly suggest that Bulgakov's concerns were moralphilosophical at least as much as social-satirical. The social-satirical interpretation of the story singles out those incidents that show how a society totally inefficient in all its public functions exploits, mistreats, and kills its greatest genius. Yet it ignores the obtrusive fact that the scientist-hero Persikov is...

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This section contains 5,737 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sigrid McLaughlin
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Critical Essay by Sigrid McLaughlin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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