Shirley | Critical Essay by Susan Gubar

This literature criticism consists of approximately 33 pages of analysis & critique of Shirley.
This section contains 9,673 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susan Gubar

Critical Essay by Susan Gubar

SOURCE: "The Genesis of Hunger, According to Shirley," in Feminist Studies, Vol. 3, Nos. 3-4, Spring-Summer, 1976, pp. 5-21.

In the following excerpt, Gubar dismisses those critics who claim that Shirley lacks unity, and praises the novel as a revolutionary text.

Charlotte Brontë's second published novel, Shirley, begins with three clergymen at table: complaining that the roast beef is tough and the beer flat, they nevertheless swallow enormous quantities of both, calling for "More bread!" and ordering their landlady to "Cut it, woman."1 They also consume all her vegetables, cheese and spice cake. Is it merely a scene of local color, part of the wrong-headed impulse that led Brontë to write an historical novel set during England's war-time depression of 1811-1812? Is it just one example of the multiple ways in which the wide-ranging omniscient point of...

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This section contains 9,673 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Susan Gubar
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