Vera Brittain | Critical Essay by Paul Delany

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Vera Brittain.
This section contains 725 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Craig Thompson

Critical Essay by Paul Delany

When Vera Brittain's Testament of Youth was published in 1933 it struck a deep chord among those in England who felt, as she did, that their youth had been 'smashed up' by the Great War. Nearly a million men of their generation lay buried in Flanders and Gallipoli; many of those who remained felt condemned to hollow lives, haunted by loss and grief. They believed that those sacrificed had been men of special grace, the irreplaceable flower of the nation's youth; and they blamed the post-war decline of Britain on their absence. The survivors—guilty, perhaps, simply of having survived—were left to bear the burden of a disappointing and mediocre peace.

Brittain became a leading spokeswoman for this national myth….

When one reads Brittain's [Chronicle of Youth] it is hard to resent the way Leighton cut across...

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This section contains 725 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Craig Thompson
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