Anne Bradstreet | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Anne Bradstreet.
This section contains 2,822 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rob Wilson

SOURCE: '"Enrapted Senses': Anne Bradstreet's 'Contemplations,' " in American Sublime: The Genealogy of a Poetic Genre, University of Wisconsin Press, 1991, pp. 67–93.

Here, Wilson argues that the sublime first emerges in American poetry in Bradstreet's verse.

 That there is a God my Reason would soon tell me
by the wondrous workes that I see, the vast frame
of the Heaven and the Earth, the order of all things,
night and day, summer and winter, spring and autumne

The consideration of these things would with amazement
certainly resolve me that there is an Eternal Being.
["To My Dear Children"]

Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672) was surely there first, but we still don't know how, poetically, to situate or claim her. The strange country of the Indian wilderness which her courtly/Christian poetry helped to domesticate and to legitimate conveys traces of a tone and tradition which later signaled, no less explicitly...

(read more)

This section contains 2,822 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Rob Wilson
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Rob Wilson from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.