Anne Bradstreet | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Anne Bradstreet.
This section contains 4,866 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paula Kopacz

SOURCE: '"To Finish What's Begun': Anne Bradstreet's Last Words," in Early American Literature, Vol. 23, No. 2, 1988, pp. 175–87.

In the following essay, Kopacz discusses the endings of Bradstreet's poems.

On a number of occasions Anne Bradstreet indicated concern about finishing her poems. In marking the hiatus after writing the first three sections of the long poem "The Four Monarchies," for example, she writes, "After some days of rest, my restless heart / To finish what's begun, new thoughts impart" (lines 1–2). Three-fourths of the way finished, she found herself "restless" to get on with the job. Forced to cut short her description of the fourth monarchy, under a formal "Apology" she writes, "To finish what's begun, was my intent" (line 3553), and she explains the circumstances that made finishing impossible. To be sure, many critics have voiced relief that this particular poem was not finished. But finishing, in the sense of completing...

(read more)

This section contains 4,866 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Paula Kopacz
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Paula Kopacz from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.