Anne Bradstreet | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 10 pages of analysis & critique of Anne Bradstreet.
This section contains 2,963 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jane Donahue Eberwein

SOURCE: '"No Rhet'ric We Expect': Argumentation in Bradstreet's 'The Prologue'," in Early American Literature, Vol. XVI, No. 1, Spring 1981, pp. 19–26.

Here, Eberwein reevaluates Bradstreet's "Prologue," concluding that, rather than a confession of humility, it is a subtle assertion of the poet's skill and power.

For an acknowledgment of a poet's simple capacities and modest literary goals, Anne Bradstreet's "The Prologue" elicits strangely varied responses—especially in regard to voice and tone. Is the poet humbly submissive or bitterly angry? Is she self-deprecating and self-denigrating, as some readers find, or a prefeminist champion of her sex? Both extremes find textual justification, depending on the weight one accords her admittedly blemished muse or her anticipated parsley wreath. Perhaps, as Elizabeth Wade White [in Anne Bradstreet: "The Tenth Muse," 1971] and Robert Arner [in "The Structure of Anne Bradstreet's Tenth Muse," in Discoveries and Considerations, 1976] have suggested, the poem divides structurally and...

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This section contains 2,963 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Jane Donahue Eberwein
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Critical Essay by Jane Donahue Eberwein from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.