A Man for All Seasons | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by John Simon

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of A Man for All Seasons.
This section contains 591 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by John Simon

Bolt's Sir Thomas More [in A Man for All Seasons] is an intellectual blessed with common sense and cursed with a conscience. He is witty, charming, and wise, and not especially eager to add to these the supererogatory virtue of heroism. His unshakable belief in Catholicism is coupled with an almost equal faith in the law …, which will protect his conscience provided it has the good sense of not going naked to its enemy. He is as loyal a minister to Henry as superior intelligence will permit, as good a husband and father as a man who lives most warmly with ideas can be, and surely the unworldliest man of the world. The play shows how this upright and religiously orthodox man, who cannot agree to Henry's remarriage and England's consequent divorce from the Church...

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This section contains 591 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Simon