Bobbie Ann Mason | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 37 pages of analysis & critique of Bobbie Ann Mason.
This section contains 9,800 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harriet Pollack

SOURCE: Pollack, Harriet. “From Shiloh to In Country to Feather Crowns: Bobbie Ann Mason, Women's History, and Southern Fiction.” Southern Literary Journal 28, no. 2 (spring 1996): 95–116.

In the following essay, Pollack examines Mason's role as a southern literary figure, and asserts that Feather Crowns cemented Mason's place as a noted women's historian.

What will it be like to read Bobbie Ann Mason's Shiloh a century from now? Will her specific allusions to the contemporary—to pop music, to brand names, to the backdrop of Kroger's and K-Mart—require a reader to grope and imagine a way towards a particular, not fully recoverable past? Will that future reading reveal Mason's fiction as more accurately described by the term “historical” than by “contemporary,” uncovering an unlikely generic resemblance to Edith Wharton's fiction: that is, to fiction that captures a specific culture, still vaguely familiar, but so specifically of a particular time and...

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This section contains 9,800 words
(approx. 33 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Harriet Pollack
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Critical Essay by Harriet Pollack from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.