Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by John Emil Sepich

This literature criticism consists of approximately 29 pages of analysis & critique of Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West.
This section contains 8,451 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by John Emil Sepich

SOURCE: Sepich, John Emil. “A ‘Bloody Dark Pastryman’: Cormac McCarthy's Recipe for Gunpowder and Historical Fiction in Blood Meridian.Mississippi Quarterly 46, no. 4 (fall 1993): 547-63.

In the following essay, Sepich argues that Blood Meridian's Judge Holden is in many ways a metaphor for Satan, and that the eventual death of “the kid” is the inevitable result of his association with Holden.

Blood Meridian, Cormac McCarthy's tale of a rough gang bounty-hunting scalps in the mid-nineteenth-century American Southwest, contains a remarkable character named Judge Holden. Judge Holden's importance in the novel is far greater than his actual position as one of this band of renegades and desperadoes under the command of the historical “Captain” John Joel Glanton.1 The gang's first...

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This section contains 8,451 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Emil Sepich