Gina Berriault | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Gina Berriault.
This section contains 147 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women in Their Beds: New and Selected Stories

SOURCE: "The Glory of Stories," in Booklist, March 15, 1996, p. 1239.

[Below, Seaman favorably reviews Women in Their Beds.]

Berriault's title story contains all the key elements of her metaphysical, compassionate fiction. Angela is deeply affected by the women she works with in a city hospital. Their fates make her think not only about her own sorrows, but about all the complex consequences of what happens to women in beds, from dreaming to sex, childbirth, and death. This elevation from the particular to the universal is a hall-mark of Berriault's finely wrought stories. Another motif is a life-altering confrontation with a stranger, such as when a librarian talks about poetry with a homeless man in "Who is it Can Tell Me Who I Am?" and a magazine writer attempts to interview a recalcitrant physicist in "God and the Article Writer." Outsiders intrigue Berriault; her insights intrigue us.

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This section contains 147 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women in Their Beds: New and Selected Stories
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Gale
Women in Their Beds: New and Selected Stories from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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