Beloved | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Deborah Horvitz

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Beloved.
This section contains 5,084 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Deborah Horvitz

Critical Essay by Deborah Horvitz

SOURCE: "Nameless Ghosts: Possession and Dispossession in Beloved," in Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 17, No. 2, Autumn, 1989, pp. 157-67.

Horvitz is a critic and psychiatric social worker. In the essay below, she provides a thematic analysis of Beloved, noting Morrison's focus on bonding, bondage, alienation, loss, memory, and mother-daughter relationships.

Toni Morrison's fifth novel, Beloved (1987), explores the insidious degradation imposed upon all slaves, even when they were owned by, in Harriet Beecher Stowe's term, "a man of humanity." The novel is also about matrilineal ancestry and the relationships among enslaved, freed, alive, and dead mothers and daughters. Equally it is about the meaning of time and memory and how remembering either destroys or saves a future. Written in an anti-minimalist, lyrical style in which biblical myths, folklore, and literary realism overlap, the text is so...

(read more)

This section contains 5,084 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Deborah Horvitz