Marvin Bell | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of Marvin Bell.
This section contains 411 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by G. E. Murray

The new work of Marvin Bell … reflects the effects of major alteration in voice and thematic course. From the breezy charm and wit of Bell's earliest poems, which frequently assumed a vaudevillian aura, and the open-hearted emotional drive of … The Escape Into You (1971), Bell now achieves a crystallization of sense and style in Stars Which See, Stars Which Do Not See. In short, the good news is that Bell has come to create with authority instead of temperament.

This, however, is not immediately apparent. In fact, the first few poems in this volume smack of mediocrity—almost as if Bell tests us by saying, "if you can survive the bread and water of these early poems, what flaming desserts I have in store for you later." And this is exactly the case. After slumping through several merely competent pages, Bell turns on in "The Mystery of Emily Dickinson...

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This section contains 411 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by G. E. Murray
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Critical Essay by G. E. Murray from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.