Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street | Critical Essay by Marvin Fisher

This literature criticism consists of approximately 26 pages of analysis & critique of Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street.
This section contains 7,517 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marvin Fisher

Critical Essay by Marvin Fisher

SOURCE: "'Bartleby,' Melville's Circumscribed Scrivener," in The Southern Review, Louisiana State University, Vol. X, No. 1, Winter, 1974, pp. 59-79.

Fisher is an American educator whose books include Going Under: Melville's Short Fiction and the American 1850's (1977). In the following essay, Fisher provides an overview of several critical approaches to "Bartleby," and insists that Melville intended Bartleby to be representative of humankind generally.

"Bartleby" is certainly the most familiar of Melville's short stories, reprinted in dozens of anthologies and analyzed by scores of critics. It would be hard to say something new about this early study of alienation, frustration, and catatonic withdrawal, and the surest guard against originality, I suspect, would be to take account of every commentary on the story. It would be more foolish, however, to try to clear one's mind completely of what others have written about Melville's...

(read more)

This section contains 7,517 words
(approx. 26 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Marvin Fisher
Follow Us on Facebook