Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Morton Kaplan and Robert Kloss

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street.
This section contains 6,533 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Morton Kaplan and Robert Kloss

Critical Essay by Morton Kaplan and Robert Kloss

SOURCE: "Fantasy of Passivity: Melville's Bartleby the Scrivener," in The Unspoken Motive: A Guide to Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism, The Free Press, 1973, pp. 63-79.

In the following excerpt, Kaplan and Kloss insist that Bartleby exhibits symptoms of manic-depression, and contend that the narrator's veneer of passivity is a neurotic attempt to repress underlying impulses toward aggression and violence.

Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener" is a work of comic irony comparable to such novels as Ford's The Good Soldier or Durrell's Justine, both of which use the device of fallible narrator. In The Good Soldier, for instance, Dowell is an unperceptive, sentimental, sexually impotent man, married to an immoral sensualist. The focus of the novel is not the inevitable failure of the marriage, but the very efforts of...

(read more)

This section contains 6,533 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Morton Kaplan and Robert Kloss