Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street | Critical Essay by Daniel Stempel and Bruce M. Stillians

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street.
This section contains 5,557 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Daniel Stempel and Bruce M. Stillians

SOURCE: "Bartleby the Scrivener: A Parable of Pessimism," in Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1972-73, pp. 268-82.

In the following essay, Stempel and Stillians consider "Bartleby" to be the result of Melville's interest in Schopenhauer.

In October 1853 a troubled Matthew Arnold explained why he had chosen to drop Empedocles on Etna from his new collection of poems. Certain situations, Arnold suggested, are intrinsically devoid of the power to provide "poetical enjoyment": "those in which the suffering finds no vent in action; in which a continuous state of mental distress is prolonged, unrelieved by incident, hope, or resistance; in which there is everything to be endured, nothing to be done. In such situations there is inevitably something morbid, in the description of them something monotonous" [Poetical Works]. And so, Empedocles, having chosen to leap...

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This section contains 5,557 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Daniel Stempel and Bruce M. Stillians
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