Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Allan Moore Emery

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of Bartleby the Scrivener, A Tale of Wall Street.
This section contains 6,069 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Allan Moore Emery

SOURCE: "The Alternatives of Melville's 'Bartleby'," in Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Vol. 31, No. 2, September, 1976, pp. 170-87.

In the following essay, Emery explores themes of freedom and limitation in "Bartleby," particularly emphasizing the doctrines of Jonathan Edwards and Joseph Priestly.

In recent years Herman Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener" has attracted its share of critics, many of whom have rightly proclaimed the tale to be an ingenious treatment of the theme of freedom and limitation. Nevertheless, two questions of preëminent importance remain unanswered: What is the precise nature of Bartleby's revolt? And how ought we to characterize the narrator's response to his mysterious clerk?

It seems to me that we can most easily answer these questions if we approach Melville's tale contextually. The Herman Melville...

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This section contains 6,069 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Allan Moore Emery